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Loring Rosellas Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011

ID No: 442125
Our Price: $54.99 $47.99
12 bottles with free shipping for: $575.00
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Quantity: MSRP:1+12+
Price: $54.99$47.99$47.92
Savings:- 13%13%
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 Wine Advocate: 92
Country:United States
Region:California
Grape Type:Pinot Noir
Winery:Loring Wine Company
Product Description

  Offering up a touch more freshness and detail, the 2011 Pinot Noir Rosella’s Vineyard is also upfront and textured, with ripe black cherry, rose garden and spring flower-like nuances all flowing to a medium-bodied, elegant and textured palate. There’s not a huge amount of back-end depth but it’s gorgeous nonetheless and I love the overall focus. It should shine for 4-5 years. Drink now-2018. This was an impressive (and large) lineup of wines. Made by the brother/sister pair, Brian and Kimberly Loring, with Rachel Silkowski functioning as assistant winemaker, these efforts never lack for fruit or texture and, for the most part, reward immediate gratification. Having said that, I think these 2011s will offer a relatively broad drink window. The 2012s are more rich and voluptuous, with the purity of fruit and seamlessness of the vintage.   (8/ 2013) Wine Advocate 92 Points

Winery: Loring Wine Company

Why I Make Pinot Noir

My name is Brian Loring and my obsession is Pinot Noir. OK, I'm also pretty crazy about Champagne, but that's another story. While in college, I worked at a wine shop in Hollywood (Victor's), where one of the owners was a Burgundy fanatic. So, my very first experiences with Pinot Noir were from producers like Domaine Dujac, Henri Jayer, and DRC. Needless to say, I found subsequent tasting safaris into the domestic Pinot Noir jungle less than satisfying. It wasn't until I literally stumbled into Calera (I tripped over a case of their wine in the store room) that I found a California Pinot Noir that I could love. But it would be quite a while before I found someone else that lived up to the standard that Josh Jensen had established. I eventually came to understand and enjoy Pinots from Williams Selyem, Chalone, and Sanford, but I really got excited about California Pinot Noir when I met Norm Beko from Cottonwood Canyon at an Orange County Wine Society tasting.

I'd made about 3 trips around the booths at the tasting without finding a single good Pinot Noir. So, being the open minded person that I am (remember I passed him up 3 times), I stopped at the Cottonwood booth. I was BLOWN away by Norm's 1990 Santa Maria Pinot Noir. After a few years of attending every Cottonwood event and asking Norm 10,000 questions about winemaking, he offered to let come learn the process during the '97 crush. I checked sugar levels, picked, crushed, punched down, pressed, filled barrels, and generally moved a bunch of stuff around with fork lifts and pallet jacks! It was the time of my life... I was totally hooked. And even though I hadn't planned it, I ended up making two barrels of Pinot Noir. That was the start of the Loring Wine Company. What had started out as a dream 15 years earlier was now a reality - I was a winemaker!

How I Make Pinot Noir

My philosophy on making wine is that the fruit is EVERYTHING. What happens in the vineyard determines the quality of the wine - I can't make it better - I can only screw it up! That's why I'm extremely picky when choosing vineyards to buy grapes from. Not only am I looking for the right soil, micro-climate, and clones, I'm also looking for a grower with the same passion and dedication to producing great wine that I have. In other words, a total Pinot Freak! My part in the vineyard equation is to throw heaping piles of money at the vineyard owners (so that they can limit yields and still make a profit) and then stay out of the way! Since most, if not all of the growers keep some fruit to make their own wine, I tell them to farm my acre(s) the same way they do theirs - since they'll obviously be doing whatever is necessary to get the best possible fruit. One of the most important decisions made in the vineyard is when to pick. Some people go by the numbers (brix, pH, TA, etc) and some go by taste. Once again, I trust the decision to the vineyard people. The day they pick the fruit for their wine is the day I'm there with a truck to pick mine. Given this approach, the wine that I produce is as much a reflection of the vineyard owner as it is of my winemaking skills. I figure that I'm extending the concept of terroir a bit to include the vineyard owner/manager... but it seems to make sense to me. The added benefit is that I'll be producing a wide variety of Pinots. It'd be boring if everything I made tasted the same.

About the Name

Sounds pretty straight forward, last name Loring, therefore Loring Wine Company. Ahhh, but what about the "Wine Company" part? That is an hommage to Josh Jensen at Calera... which is actually Calera Wine Company. Since he was the guy who showed me that great Pinot Noir could be made in California, I decided to name my winery Loring Wine Company to "honor" him. Hopefully, Josh sees it for what it is and doesn't want to sue me for trademark infringement!

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Organic/Free Shipping


Pago de Carraovejas Reserva 2014

This wine will ship around Nov 28th


Made from 78% Tempranillo, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon and 7% Merlot, aged in French oak barrels for 12 months, this is an elegant medium to full-bodied wine with ripe red fruits, sweet spices combined with toasty notes. The tannins provide texture and roundness and the finish is long and intense.

The 2014 vintage was marked by a very early start to the cycle. In April, the vineyards at Pago de Carraovejas already showed signs of activity, which is highly unusual. It was a very hot spring leading into a summer that was cooler than usual and enhanced by an unbeatable end to the cycle with a September that was more like summer than Autumn. The slow, careful grape-picking began on 26 September and ended on 18 October with the picking of the Cabernet Sauvignon. The rain around the time of the grape-picking lengthened the process but the quality and health parameters remained intact for such a peculiar—as regards weather—and promising vintage due to its quality.

We make our Reserva using selected grapes from vineyards with a greater potential for performance, in other words, with a fruit concentration and, at the same time, appropriate levels of acidity and firm, ripe tannins. Our process respects the fruit and we work slowly and meticulously: we pick our grapes by hand and we transport them in crates. Depending on the plot of land they come from and the time they arrive at the winery, the grape may be put into cold rooms to prevent oxidation and preserve their aroma.
We then perform a second selection process at the winery, rejecting any grapes that do not meet our criteria, using a selection table. The grapes are brought into the cellar and are allowed to settle naturally.
The vats are filled slowly and gently. Depending on the characteristics that we detect during the tasting, we ferment the grapes in stainless steel vats or French oak.
For this fermentation, we use our own yeast, from our vineyard and is isolated by our team. This concept is partially responsible for the character of Carraovejas. During fermentation, a relatively low temperature is maintained, using dry ice if necessary. After the alcoholic fermentation, the undergo spontaneous malolactic fermentation, which takes place in stainless steel or oak, depending on the characteristics of the wines. The barrel ageing is marked by respect for the character of the wine. Most of it was aged in extra-fine-grain, French oak barrels for a minimum of 12 months – the time it remains in the cellar before being put on the market, bottled and sealed with selected natural cork.

A great match with red meat, game, pastas, ham and hard cheeses.


Review:

"Plenty of creamy baking spice aromas, with coal smoke, dried plums and cherries manifesting in a really brooding nose. The palate has impressive focus and just the right amount of generous flesh. Will age well, ready now."
- James Suckling (July 2017), 92 pts

 92 Points