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Loring Garys Vineyard Pinot Noir 2013

ID No: 442268
Our Price: $60.00 $43.00
 $43.00 
 Wine Enthusiast: 95
Country:United States
Region:California
Grape Type:Pinot Noir
Winery:Loring Wine Company
Product Description

Medium-deep ruby color; deep, tight aromas of cherry and oak; deep, big cherry flavors with smoky spice notes; silky texture; good structure and balance; long finish. Deep, forward Pinot with a lot there that still needs to come around. Needs time and air.- Pinot Report 94 Points

"Brian Loring’s bottling of this vineyard planted by Gary Pisoni and Gary Franscioni is bursting with raspberry syrup, cola and peppercorns on the nose. The palate boasts notes of strawberry juice, red berries and hibiscus. It’s luxurious and sexy. - Matt Kettmann"

- Wine Enthusiast Magazine (July 1st 2015), 95 pts

 

Winery: Loring Wine Company

Why I Make Pinot Noir

My name is Brian Loring and my obsession is Pinot Noir. OK, I'm also pretty crazy about Champagne, but that's another story. While in college, I worked at a wine shop in Hollywood (Victor's), where one of the owners was a Burgundy fanatic. So, my very first experiences with Pinot Noir were from producers like Domaine Dujac, Henri Jayer, and DRC. Needless to say, I found subsequent tasting safaris into the domestic Pinot Noir jungle less than satisfying. It wasn't until I literally stumbled into Calera (I tripped over a case of their wine in the store room) that I found a California Pinot Noir that I could love. But it would be quite a while before I found someone else that lived up to the standard that Josh Jensen had established. I eventually came to understand and enjoy Pinots from Williams Selyem, Chalone, and Sanford, but I really got excited about California Pinot Noir when I met Norm Beko from Cottonwood Canyon at an Orange County Wine Society tasting.

I'd made about 3 trips around the booths at the tasting without finding a single good Pinot Noir. So, being the open minded person that I am (remember I passed him up 3 times), I stopped at the Cottonwood booth. I was BLOWN away by Norm's 1990 Santa Maria Pinot Noir. After a few years of attending every Cottonwood event and asking Norm 10,000 questions about winemaking, he offered to let come learn the process during the '97 crush. I checked sugar levels, picked, crushed, punched down, pressed, filled barrels, and generally moved a bunch of stuff around with fork lifts and pallet jacks! It was the time of my life... I was totally hooked. And even though I hadn't planned it, I ended up making two barrels of Pinot Noir. That was the start of the Loring Wine Company. What had started out as a dream 15 years earlier was now a reality - I was a winemaker!

How I Make Pinot Noir

My philosophy on making wine is that the fruit is EVERYTHING. What happens in the vineyard determines the quality of the wine - I can't make it better - I can only screw it up! That's why I'm extremely picky when choosing vineyards to buy grapes from. Not only am I looking for the right soil, micro-climate, and clones, I'm also looking for a grower with the same passion and dedication to producing great wine that I have. In other words, a total Pinot Freak! My part in the vineyard equation is to throw heaping piles of money at the vineyard owners (so that they can limit yields and still make a profit) and then stay out of the way! Since most, if not all of the growers keep some fruit to make their own wine, I tell them to farm my acre(s) the same way they do theirs - since they'll obviously be doing whatever is necessary to get the best possible fruit. One of the most important decisions made in the vineyard is when to pick. Some people go by the numbers (brix, pH, TA, etc) and some go by taste. Once again, I trust the decision to the vineyard people. The day they pick the fruit for their wine is the day I'm there with a truck to pick mine. Given this approach, the wine that I produce is as much a reflection of the vineyard owner as it is of my winemaking skills. I figure that I'm extending the concept of terroir a bit to include the vineyard owner/manager... but it seems to make sense to me. The added benefit is that I'll be producing a wide variety of Pinots. It'd be boring if everything I made tasted the same.

About the Name

Sounds pretty straight forward, last name Loring, therefore Loring Wine Company. Ahhh, but what about the "Wine Company" part? That is an hommage to Josh Jensen at Calera... which is actually Calera Wine Company. Since he was the guy who showed me that great Pinot Noir could be made in California, I decided to name my winery Loring Wine Company to "honor" him. Hopefully, Josh sees it for what it is and doesn't want to sue me for trademark infringement!

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Marcassin Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir 2012

Marcassin Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir 2012 in stock and ready to ship. 

Review:

The 2012 Pinot Noir Marcassin Vineyard, which comes primarily from the Calera clone (although I suspect there are a few mystery clones in their plantings), always seems to remind me of a grand cru from Burgundy’s Côte de Nuits, particularly Morey-St.-Denis. Dense ruby/plum, its sweet nose of strawberries, black cherry liqueur, fresh porcini mushrooms and forest floor is followed by a dark, full-bodied, rich and concentrated wine that is supple, dramatic, and even flamboyant. Drink it over the next 12-15 years. 97 Points Rrbert Parker

 

 Wine Advocate: 97
Loring Wine Company Rosellas Vineyard Pinot Noir 2013

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A full-bodied, robust style, with abundant and evenly distributed flavors, featuring notes of ripe pear, guava and nectarine balanced by spicy, smoky oak. Ends with a long and zesty finish.

 


Review:

Medium-deep ruby color; complex, earthy, dark cherry aromas with oak and anise notes; deep, complex, dark cherry flavors with savory spice and anise notes; some oak; silky texture; good structure and balance; long finish. Spicy, rich Pinot with really nice layered flavors.- Pinot Report 94 Points

 Wine Advocate: 94
Buty Merlot Cabernet Franc 2014

Made from  67% Merlot and  33% Cabernet Franc

Vineyard: This vintage was sourced exclusively from the sloping, sandy soils of the famed Conner Lee Vineyard. Conner Lee is a cool site in a warm, sunny region of Washington. In this eastern Washington desert, the hot summer ripens the fruit, while the diurnal temperatures keep the acids high and the pH low. Buty has bottled a blend of merlot & cabernet franc since 2000, our inaugural vintage.


Winemaking: We hand-sorted and destemmed with gravity transfer to tank,

which allowed us to preserve the fruit's abundant aromatics. We aerated during fermentation in wood tanks for two weeks and selected only free-run wine to blend. The wines were aged 15 months in Taransaud and Bel Air French Château barrels, one-third of which were new, with minimal racking. 


Tasting Notes: While the majority of this blend is merlot, the intensity of the
cabernet franc in is amazing. Not only does it add a vivid floral component to the wine, but it brings a rare blueberry note that underscores the dark berry and jam aromas of the merlot. New oak aging for select lots contributes citrus and cinnamon spice layers, with cool vintage acidity adding poise and precision. The mid-palate is juicy and rich, with plush tannins that lead to a long, sophisticated finish, with hints of blackberry, brioche and spice.

 


Review:

"Supple, broad and expressive, layering rose petal–accented cherry and plum flavors against powdery tannins, finishing with sleekness and harmony. Drink now through 2024.—H.S"
- Wine Spectator's Insider (October 5th 2016), 92 pts

 

 Wine Spectator: 92
Lucas & Lewellen Pinot Noir Goodchild-High 9 2013

This is a limited vintage from the highest nine acre block of the Goodchild Vineyard, where the cool climate produces highly concentrated clone 667 grapes. This wine was aged sur lees for 11 months in French oak, bringing forth the natural flavors of lively red fruit with smooth tannins and a lingering finish.


Reviews:

Juicy strawberries, raspberries and plums are balanced by wet slate on the nose of this wine from grape growing pioneer Louis Lucas and his vintner-partner, Judge Royce Lewellen. The palate shows more raspberry and a bit of boysenberry along with an orange rind tartness and woody herbs like juniper and black sage. - Wine Enthusiast 93 Points

 

 
 Wine Enthusiast: 93
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Marcassin Sonoma Coast Chardonnay 2013

Marcassin Sonoma Coast Chardonnay is made from 100 percent Chardonnay. 


The 2013 Chardonnay Marcassin Vineyard may be even better. Notes of caramelized citrus, hazelnut, apple blossom, lemon oil and orange marmalade are all present in this wine of dazzling aromatic and flavor dimension. It is full-bodied, again shows some wet pebbles (which I equate with minerality), vibrant acidity, and no real evidence of any oak. Much like the 2012, the finish goes on for 45+ seconds. This is another killer Chardonnay from Helen Turley and John Wetlaufer. -Wine Advocate 100 Points

What an extraordinary tasting this was at the Marcassin winery just north of Santa Rosa in Sonoma County. Just when you think the duo of Helen Turley and John Wetlaufer can’t make greater wines, they bowl over the taster with an array of exquisite quality that really must be tasted to be believed. Marcassin was probably California’s greatest Chardonnay after the famous Chalone winery fell from the pinnacle and onto hard times in the 1980s (and it has yet to rebound). Moreover, Marcassin set the bar for great Pinot Noir as well. And while both their Chardonnay and Pinot Noir have many competitors these days (from the likes of Harford Court, Mark Aubert, Kistler, Kongsgaard, DuMol, Thomas Brown, Peter Michael, Martinelli and Luc Morlet, to name a few), John Wetlaufer and Helen Turley remain the reigning geniuses of these two varietals in California. Certainly, their meticulous attention to detail in both the vineyard and in the winemaking and élevage account for the quality, but they were among the pioneers who saw the unlimited potential from the Sonoma Coast, now a relatively crowded neighborhood. This was a remarkable tasting that simply blew me away, and I have been following their wines since the first Marcassins were made in the early 1990s. By the way, any doubts about aging potential should be crushed immediately, as even in the most challenging vintages in California, Marcassin Chardonnays and Pinots have aged as well as, if not better than just about any grand cru white Burgundy. For example, 1995 and 1996 Chardonnays, particularly those from the Lorenzo Vineyard, are incredibly youthful and dynamic, and the Marcassin Estate Pinot Noir, even from vintages such as 1998, is simply amazing. The three Chardonnays tasted include two perfect wines. Perhaps the closest comparison is not to anything made in California, but a Corton-Charlemagne in a top vintage from the famous Jean François Coche-Dury.



 Wine Advocate: 100